The Societal Implications of the Patent Act of 1790

The Societal Implications of the Patent Act of 1790

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The Societal Implications of the Patent Act of 1790

 

It is not obscure knowledge that patent lawInternational Patent Lawpatent infringementprotection of patentspatent applications, he was originally opposed to the idea of instituting a patent law system at the national level. Jefferson's main concern was that of the potential of patents lending to the creation of monopolies over the patented and protected devices and inventions. Another politician, George Mason from Virginia, shared his sentiment regarding patent law and monopolies. 

These politicians also seemed to reflect the same concern as some of the states, namely Maryland and North Carolina, which both had state laws outlawing monopolies. Jefferson and Mason also expressed their concerns that even though there was a time limit or expiration placed on patents of fourteen years, it could promote the possibility of creating a limited monopoly in the least. Jefferson himself, having created certain inventions, never applied for patents for any of his creations as a result of his skepticism of the inclusion of the new parent law. However, as it is evident, the Patent Act of 1790 made its way into legislature and the history books, and has managed to become quite a successful application of federal law, for its provisions are still used and reflected today in modern United States patent law and the patent process. Contact patent lawyers to review your case.

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